The Science And Fine Art of Fasting

By Herbert M. Shelton

One of the key tenets of natural hygiene is toxemia + enervation = disease and that symptoms of disease are remedial efforts by the body to return to balance. For example, a fever is instituted by the body to speed metabolic action and kill germs. It is a healing event that should be allowed to run its course, not a dreaded enemy to be suppressed. The best action to take when first becoming ill is to stop eating and rest, which goes contrary to the prevailing advice to take a drug, eat to keep up your strength, and keep on going. When you fast, you are not starving your body of nutrition, because it obtains all the nutrition it needs from its own tissues. But in doing so, the not inconsiderable amount of energy that would have been spent in digestion is now spent in repair of tissues and elimination of toxins. 

Chapters include:

Definition of fasting
Fasting among the lower animals
Fasting in man
Bill-of-fare for the sick
Autolysis
Fasting is not starving
Chemical and organic changes during fasting
Repair of organs and tissues during fasting
The influence of fasting on growth and regeneration
Changes in the fundamental functions while fasting
The mind and special senses during a fast
Secretions and excretions
Bowel action during fasting
Fasting and sex
Rejuvenescence through fasting
Gain and loss of strength while fasting
Gain and loss of weight during fasting
Fasting does not induce deficiency “disease”
Death in the fast
Objections of the fast
Does fasting cure disease?
The rationale of fasting
The length of the fast
Hunger and appetite
Contra-indications of fasting
Fasting in special periods and conditions of life
Symptomatology of the fast
Progress of the fast
Hygiene of the fast
Breaking the fast
Gaining weight after the fast
Living after the fast
Fasting in health
Fasting in acute disease
Fasting in chronic disease
Fasting in drug addiction
Fasting versus eliminating diets

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